Albert Riera Galceran in conversation with Juan Moreno López-Calull

I met Albert Riera Galceran at the opening of “Servicio Continuo”, his first collective exhibition in Barcelona. I immediately felt an extreme connection with his work. This past June I’ve had the pleasure to curate his latest exhibition “Lust” this time based in London. Albert was born with the gift of being creative. Like many other young artists, he originally started out drawing and using photography. Once in high school,  he learned modern techniques and he’s been painting ever since. Today, he creates stunning, highly inspiring paintings meant to trigger emotions and feelings for each and every viewer. Albert states that his greatest accomplishment as an artist is his ability to practice his art on a regular basis.

Albert Riera Galceran in conversation with Juan Moreno López-Calull

I met Albert Riera Galceran at the opening of “Servicio Continuo”, his first collective exhibition in Barcelona. I immediately felt an extreme connection with his work. This past June I’ve had the pleasure to curate his latest exhibition “Lust” this time based in London. Albert was born with the gift of being creative. Like many other young artists, he originally started out drawing and using photography. Once in high school,  he learned modern techniques and he’s been painting ever since. Today, he creates stunning, highly inspiring paintings meant to trigger emotions and feelings for each and every viewer. Albert states that his greatest accomplishment as an artist is his ability to practice his art on a regular basis.

You’re living in London? That’s right! What made you choose to move to London? The main reason was to study but it was a bigger decision than that. I needed my own space, find myself in a place where everything was new and there were lots of things to discover. You had a solo exhibition in London, in Gallery 46, how was it? The exhibition went amazingly good. I had the support of my family and friends and it’s always nice to see your work displayed in a gallery, it really has an effect on how you perceive the work. Gallery 46 has an amazing space in London and it really worked for my type of paintings. I was surprised to see that many collectors come to the exhibition. Once you started exploring art did you start with painting or did you use other mediums? It’s curious because as I child I use to paint and draw, even once I won a price in a drawing contest but then, growing up I started taking lots of

photos. I perceived the world through photography and I became obsessed capturing everything that surrounded me. …So do you explain yourself through a pencil? The pencil it’s like an extension of your hand, it always allows you to capture your thoughts instantly. My dad used to tell me, if you have an idea, write it down. So yes, I guess I do. Abstract art evokes a lot of emotions through color and composition. Can you tell us how you use color and composition to evoke emotion in your pieces? My use of color comes from what I see. I’ve been educating myself to find compositions of color that captivate me within photography and that is something I bring with me when I’m painting. It’s fascinating to me how color works and why some colors together have such a harmonious impact on us. I wrote an essay on color harmony and I found lots of information that now make even more sense

You’re living in London? That’s right! What made you choose to move to London? The main reason was to study but it was a bigger decision than that. I needed my own space, find myself in a place where everything was new and there were lots of things to discover. You had a solo exhibition in London, in Gallery 46, how was it? The exhibition went amazingly good. I had the support of my family and friends and it’s always nice to see your work displayed in a gallery, it really has an effect on how you perceive the work. Gallery 46 has an amazing space in London and it really worked for my type of paintings. I was surprised to see that many collectors come to the exhibition. Once you started exploring art did you start with painting or did you use other mediums? It’s curious because as I child I use to paint and draw, even once I won a price in a drawing contest but then, growing up I started taking lots of photos. I perceived the world through photography and I became obsessed capturing everything that surrounded me. …So do you explain yourself through a pencil? The pencil it’s like an extension of your hand, it always allows you to capture your thoughts instantly. My dad used to tell me, if you have an idea, write it down. So yes, I guess I do. Abstract art evokes a lot of emotions through color and composition. Can you tell us how you use color and composition to evoke emotion in your pieces? My use of color comes from what I see. I’ve been educating myself to find compositions of color that captivate me within photography and that is something I bring with me when I’m painting. It’s fascinating to me how color works and why some colors together have such a harmonious impact on us. I wrote an essay on color harmony and I found lots of information that now make even more sense

with my practice. This quote of Monet I read reflects exactly what I do on a daily basis: “Try to forget what objects you have before you - a tree, a house, a field, or whatever. Merely think, 'Here is a little square of blue, here an oblong of pink, here a streak of yellow,' and paint it just as it looks to you, the exact color and shape, until it gives you your own impression of the scene before you. “  Is there a color that’s always stood out to you as being particularly powerful? I don’t know if this answers your question but I have an especial connection with pink. I have the theory that pink is the color that always harmonizes with any other color. I sometimes refuse to use it but it end up being the color that is lasting and that I wasn’t finding. What is your creative process like? My process it’s always very intuitive. I never plan what to paint so I never know how the result is

going to look like. I start taking decisions on which colors I want to use and normally one decision leads to the next one. I’m spontaneous but always keeping an eye to find the balance and the harmony within the painting. My work is completely based on the act of painting and what I get from that. I evoke lots of emotions when I paint and it’s to me a way of meditation.  The painting itself it ends up being the proof of my emotional discharge. Are your paintings all a hedonistic act? I would say so. It’s always very pleasing to paint and get involved with all the materials used. I think that the canvas allows you to do whatever you want with it and just the thought of that is hedonistic. It’s your space to express and feel and connect with your inside being. At the end it’s always a reflection of yourself, a narcissistic perspective which you can learn and grow from. Are

with my practice. This quote of Monet I read reflects exactly what I do on a daily basis: “Try to forget what objects you have before you – a tree, a house, a field, or whatever. Merely think, ‘Here is a little square of blue, here an oblong of pink, here a streak of yellow,’ and paint it just as it looks to you, the exact color and shape, until it gives you your own impression of the scene before you. “  Is there a color that’s always stood out to you as being particularly powerful? I don’t know if this answers your question but I have an especial connection with pink. I have the theory that pink is the color that always harmonizes with any other color. I sometimes refuse to use it but it end up being the color that is lasting and that I wasn’t finding. What is your creative process like? My process it’s always very intuitive. I never plan what to paint so I never know how the result is going to look like. I start taking decisions on which colors I want to use and normally one decision leads to the next one. I’m spontaneous but always keeping an eye to find the balance and the harmony within the painting. My work is completely based on the act of painting and what I get from that. I evoke lots of emotions when I paint and it’s to me a way of meditation.  The painting itself it ends up being the proof of my emotional discharge. Are your paintings all a hedonistic act? I would say so. It’s always very pleasing to paint and get involved with all the materials used. I think that the canvas allows you to do whatever you want with it and just the thought of that is hedonistic. It’s your space to express and feel and connect with your inside being. At the end it’s always a reflection of yourself, a narcissistic perspective which you can learn and grow from. Are

there any artists that have been significant in your progression as a painter? Sure, lots and very different from each other. I like artists for many different reasons but what it’s more important to me is to feel the soul from what I’m seeing. If I had to say some artists that have been significant in my progression I would say Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler and Cy Twombly. Do you think that what your eye sees it’s not what the viewer may ultimately get? Completely and I think it should be like that. Everyone has his own experience with a painting and I’m particularly interested on that. My paintings are very personal and for the fact of being an abstract expression you can’t identify figurative forms. That

allows the painting to have a wider reaction to the viewer. It’s interesting to me to see what others might get from my paintings and them to share those feelings with me. What’s next for you as far as projects are concerned? Now I’ll be working and experimenting a lot with painting and also want to start with some sculpture. I rented a studio in the Catalan Coast and I’ll be focused on making work related to my experience with the Mediterranean, which I’m in love with. Any words of advice for aspiring artists? I’m still too young to give some advice but I would say keep your work always honest, whatever is it that you do.

there any artists that have been significant in your progression as a painter? Sure, lots and very different from each other. I like artists for many different reasons but what it’s more important to me is to feel the soul from what I’m seeing. If I had to say some artists that have been significant in my progression I would say Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler and Cy Twombly. Do you think that what your eye sees it’s not what the viewer may ultimately get? Completely and I think it should be like that. Everyone has his own experience with a painting and I’m particularly interested on that. My paintings are very personal and for the fact of being an abstract expression you can’t identify figurative forms. That allows the painting to have a wider reaction to the viewer. It’s interesting to me to see what others might get from my paintings and them to share those feelings with me. What’s next for you as far as projects are concerned? Now I’ll be working and experimenting a lot with painting and also want to start with some sculpture. I rented a studio in the Catalan Coast and I’ll be focused on making work related to my experience with the Mediterranean, which I’m in love with. Any words of advice for aspiring artists? I’m still too young to give some advice but I would say keep your work always honest, whatever is it that you do.

Interviewed by Juan Moreno López-Calull. Photography Nicolás Feriche
As seen in Hercules Universal XXIII
Interviewed by Juan Moreno López-Calull
Photography Nicolás Feriche
As seen in Hercules Universal XXIII